Description

Illustration of Tibetan Terrier

Closely related to the Lhasa Apso, the Tibetan Terrier was classified with that breed at early dog shows in the UK as a Lhasa Terrier. The breed is not a terrier but has been used as a herding dog for sheep.

The breed first came out of Tibet thanks to an English surgeon, Dr Greig who was working in a hospital on the Indian/Tibetan border in the early 1920s. When she returned to England in the 1930s she brought her dogs with her and her Lamleh strain was instrumental in establishing the breed both in the UK and in the USA. The breed was recognised by the Kennel Club in 1937.

Squarely built and rustic in appearance, the Tibetan Terrier has gained great popularity as a show dog in recent years.

Breed Group
Utility
Vulnerable Native Breed
No
Size
Small
How much exercise?
Up to 1 hour per day
Length of coat
Long
How much grooming?
Every day
Supposedly sheds? *
No
Town or Country
Either
Type of home
Small House
Minimum Garden Size
Small/Medium
Lifespan
Over 12 Years

* If you are asthmatic or have an allergy, you should consult your medical advisor before considering obtaining a dog. More information can also be found on the Kennel Club website.

The Utility Breed Group

This group consists of miscellaneous breeds of dog mainly of a non-sporting origin, including the Bulldog, Dalmatian, Akita and Poodle.

The name ‘Utility’ essentially means fitness for a purpose and this group consists of an extremely mixed and varied bunch, most breeds having been selectively bred to perform a specific function not included in the sporting and working categories. Some of the breeds listed in the group are the oldest documented breeds of dog in the world.


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