Description

Illustration of Bulldog

Bull baiting was introduced to Britain by the Normans in the 12th Century when they used mastiff-type dogs to torment bulls. By the 16th Century bull baiting was a popular ‘entertainment’ for all classes. The leggier mastiff types were replaced by smaller, thick-set dogs with strong heads and powerful jaws, these being the ancestors of the modern Bulldog.

In 1835 bull baiting was made illegal and the future of the breed, now without a function, was threatened. Those kept as companions provided the nucleus for the regeneration of the breed when dog showing became fashionable. The Kennel Club recognised the bulldog in 1873 and he remains the iconic British breed, thought to symbolise the spirit of the country.

Since the start of the 21st Century dedicated breeders have worked hard to improve the health of the breed by reducing exaggeration in the physical features. Changes to the Kennel Club Standard have militated against exaggeration with a strong focus on health and welfare. The Bulldog remains hugely popular as a family companion for his great character and loyalty.

Breed Group
Utility
Vulnerable Native Breed
No
Size
Medium
How much exercise?
Up to 1 hour per day
Length of coat
Short
How much grooming?
Once a week
Supposedly sheds? *
Yes
Town or Country
Either
Type of home
Small House
Minimum Garden Size
Small/Medium
Lifespan
Under 10 Years

* If you are asthmatic or have an allergy, you should consult your medical advisor before considering obtaining a dog. More information can also be found on the Kennel Club website.

The Utility Breed Group

This group consists of miscellaneous breeds of dog mainly of a non-sporting origin, including the Bulldog, Dalmatian, Akita and Poodle.

The name ‘Utility’ essentially means fitness for a purpose and this group consists of an extremely mixed and varied bunch, most breeds having been selectively bred to perform a specific function not included in the sporting and working categories. Some of the breeds listed in the group are the oldest documented breeds of dog in the world.


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